Jump to content

Primary: Sky Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Secondary: Sky Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Pattern: Blank Waves Squares Notes Sharp Wood Rockface Leather Honey Vertical Triangles
* * * * - (3.92 - 53votes)

Cyber Alice and Inaba-kun


Alt Names: alt Cyber-Alice and Inaba-kunalt Dennou Alice to Inaba-kunalt 電脳アリスと因幡くん
Author: Kusaka Shinya
Artist: Fujinari Takumi
Genres: Drama DramaMystery MysteryRomance RomanceSci-fi Sci-fiShoujo ShoujoShounen Shounen
Type: Manga (Japanese)
Status: Complete
Description: Shuuichi Inaba is a student of a special high school for young prodigies and one of the users of the newest and most popular application called 'Alice in Cyberland' - an app with an AI that enables its users to talk to them as with any other human. When some of the students of his high school start to get attacked by a mysterious culprit, Shuuichi is determined to find out who it is. In his investigation, he stumbles upon 'Alice' - a special kind of program, which, in return for helping him with the case, demands only to know something he would usually never tell anyone - his biggest and deepest secret.
Go to Cyber Alice and Inaba-kun Forums! | Scroll Down to Comments


Latest Forum Posts

Topic Started By Stats Last Post Info
No topics has been found for this comic.

x

Register now for full access! You'll be able to follow (bookmark) your favorites, get updates on new releases, and more! It's completely free and only takes a minute.



83 Comments

Everytime they show the cool battles and great speeches in the cyberworld I can't help but imagine all those people in the real world in the same room looking dramatically at their smartphones like a bunch of idiots.

 

I really liked this manga, though. Bad ending, but obviously due to the axe. A shame, it was quite creative and interesting, with good characters. It defied the common cliché when

Spoiler
. A fun read indeed.

The plot was, wow. I cant even begin to talk about how bland and nonsensical (for lack of explanation i guess) it was. The art too, everyone looked stiff and like marionettes even if they were moving. In my opinion, it was a matter of time before the eventual cancelation that took place.

Most people talk about "Stereotypes" as if it were a bad word.  But for business models and demographic targeting studies, "Stereotypes" are all-important tools to be used.  The trick is to be able to determine exactly what the current stereotypes in a targeted demographic group are.

 

If it is determined, for example, that young teenage girls prefer tender, romantic stories, then THAT becomes the stereotype for shoujo manga.

 

That is just a very simple example, and there could well be several other factors that go into determining the standard shoujo stereotype, but I'm sure that you know what I mean. 

 

So a shoujo magazine will tend to have series primarily in it that they believe will appeal to their stereotypical audience, but it is also possible that some of their series may, (And indeed be DESIGNED to), appeal to other demographic groups in an attempt to widen their audience base and thus increase their sales and their profits.

 

Thus, a series MAY primarily have an appeal to shounen audiences, with just enough of a shoujo look to it to be included in a shoujo magazine.

 

I would therefore make the claim that the magazine's primary audience should NOT be used to give a series a certain genre tag, but instead, the content of the series should be used to determine that tag.

 

But I also understand that this tagging of shounen or shoujo to a series has been traditionally determined by what type of magazine it was originally published in.  And while I personally may disagree with that tradition, I fully recognize people's desire to hold on to it.

 

I'm just not one of those people who hold on to a tradition for that tradition's sake.  But I'm also sure that many would disagree with me on this.

Fair points and all, but it's a tradition because it's simple and it works. 95% of the time, the magazine demographic and manga demographic are the same.

 

Changing that would add nothing - simply cause arguments and add a layer of complexity.

 

Edit: Also the ending was dumb. Really dumb. Urgh.

This was kinda boring, actually. It just lacked substance.

 

Also, the ending was absolutely horrible.

Even when considering it was rushed, it ended up being so gaudy, I facepalmed all the way through the last few chapters.

 

Overall, it went from plain boring to plain horrible. Would not recommend.

"Physical manifestation of the human hatred." In a mobile game.

 

Yes, it makes perfect sense.

 

Whatevs, thanks for translating this manga.

and the axe falls.

Eh. It was an alright ending. Rushed as all hell but at least it provided some closure.

awww someone pulled a plug on this so we're left with a unsatisfying ending :(

what a shitty ending

Such an open ending. I hope there is source material I can go read that delves deeper.
Doesn't feel like adapted from LN. Axed or mangaka lost interest?

That's the end? I wish we got some more time getting to know the actual Alice and her history with the Red Queen and such. It feels a little... lacking...

Assuming chapter 10 is the end of volume 2 then yeah it is :( does this have a LN?

It's...over? =(

who cares about that, just read this shit and be dere for alice!

Spoiler

 

Going with the content of the manga is going to bring up some serious problems when a manga that isn't traditional comes up. Think of Death Note. Is that one a Shounen? Is it a Seinen? How can you ever be sure if it's undeniably going for both?

 

Going with the magazine's target demographic is the best option because Shounen and Shoujo ARE NOT genres, they're demographics.

Whoa wall of text XD

Hmm this is getting interesting..

the queen <3

Most people talk about "Stereotypes" as if it were a bad word.  But for business models and demographic targeting studies, "Stereotypes" are all-important tools to be used.  The trick is to be able to determine exactly what the current stereotypes in a targeted demographic group are.

 

If it is determined, for example, that young teenage girls prefer tender, romantic stories, then THAT becomes the stereotype for shoujo manga.

 

That is just a very simple example, and there could well be several other factors that go into determining the standard shoujo stereotype, but I'm sure that you know what I mean. 

 

So a shoujo magazine will tend to have series primarily in it that they believe will appeal to their stereotypical audience, but it is also possible that some of their series may, (And indeed be DESIGNED to), appeal to other demographic groups in an attempt to widen their audience base and thus increase their sales and their profits.

 

Thus, a series MAY primarily have an appeal to shounen audiences, with just enough of a shoujo look to it to be included in a shoujo magazine.

 

I would therefore make the claim that the magazine's primary audience should NOT be used to give a series a certain genre tag, but instead, the content of the series should be used to determine that tag.

 

But I also understand that this tagging of shounen or shoujo to a series has been traditionally determined by what type of magazine it was originally published in.  And while I personally may disagree with that tradition, I fully recognize people's desire to hold on to it.

 

I'm just not one of those people who hold on to a tradition for that tradition's sake.  But I'm also sure that many would disagree with me on this.

But the intended demographic of the manga is the magazine it is published in. If the manga is published in a magazine with no intended demographics (They probably exist, at least they should), then the manga also has no intended demographic.

The intended demographic of the manga is the intended demographic of the manga. The intended demographic of the magazine is the intended demographic of the magazine. There are plenty of reasons why a manga can have a different target demographic than the magazine, and if i had to guess this one would be due to the art style.

Food for thought: Some animes that don't have mangas can be called shounen or shoujo, why do you think that is? Answer: It depends on the content and not where it is published/produced.

I never really said that the intended demographic of the manga didn't matter, I said the intended demographic of the magazine didn't matter. But how does one get to know the intended demographic of the manga? Besides word-of-god, the method I describe can be used.
 

But the intended demographic of the manga is the magazine it is published in. If the manga is published in a magazine with no intended demographics (They probably exist, at least they should), then the manga also has no intended demographic.

 The intended demographic does matter though. It is the only possible objective judging of where a manga belongs to. Also, if the manga didn't pander to females in the first place, a shoujo magazine definitely wouldn't publish it. About the stereotypes, the genre tags are way different than the demographic tags regarding this issue. You are right about stereotypes being important in genres, but they play absolutely no part in demographics. Let me put it like this; if a manga contained stereotypes from both shoujo and shounen, should it be considered both shoujo and shounen?

Neither I guess, since its not really focused on a single age group.

I never really said that the intended demographic of the manga didn't matter, I said the intended demographic of the magazine didn't matter. But how does one get to know the intended demographic of the manga? Besides word-of-god, the method I describe can be used.

And stereotypes do matter when it comes to demographic tags, one could argue especially there. After all, how does one(or rather society) decide whether a toy is for boys or girls.
Color, softness, intended use, so yeah, stereotypes.

*edit*
This will only change once the stereotypes have changed(perhaps swords and stuff will become a girl/neutral thing when the hipsters take over), and there is a difference from culture to culture, but it is still in the end based on stereotypes. 

The intended demographic of the magazine doesn't really matter. What matters are the traits present that serve to attract certain demographics. A stupid-smart male protagonist that solves mysteries? A beautiful girl that doesn't merely serve as an ojou-sama or onee-sama for the other females? Definitely shounen.

Another point I'd like to make is that some genres are built upon stereotypes(social norms, ethics, etc.), the shounen and shoujo genres being some of them. This is why some mangas can have the horror tag without actually being scary, because they contain the common elements of horror stories. So yeah, stereotypes play an important part. 

And now I realize that those comments were made months ago. Oh well, already typed it.

 

 The intended demographic does matter though. It is the only possible objective judging of where a manga belongs to. Also, if the manga didn't pander to females in the first place, a shoujo magazine definitely wouldn't publish it. About the stereotypes, the genre tags are way different than the demographic tags regarding this issue. You are right about stereotypes being important in genres, but they play absolutely no part in demographics. Let me put it like this; if a manga contained stereotypes from both shoujo and shounen, should it be considered both shoujo and shounen?

The intended demographic of the magazine doesn't really matter. What matters are the traits present that serve to attract certain demographics. A stupid-smart male protagonist that solves mysteries? A beautiful girl that doesn't merely serve as an ojou-sama or onee-sama for the other females? Definitely shounen.

Another point I'd like to make is that some genres are built upon stereotypes(social norms, ethics, etc.), the shounen and shoujo genres being some of them. This is why some mangas can have the horror tag without actually being scary, because they contain the common elements of horror stories. So yeah, stereotypes play an important part. 

And now I realize that those comments were made months ago. Oh well, already typed it.

Hmmm... at this point I have to wonder...if most of the AI's are in fact things that need to be exterminated. And really Inaba should get his own AI (aside from lily since she most likely can't be trusted) He would make the perfect "Mad Hatter"


Search Comics