Jump to content

Primary: Sky Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Secondary: Sky Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Pattern: Blank Waves Squares Notes Sharp Wood Rockface Leather Honey Vertical Triangles
* * * * - (3.78 - 27votes)

Mathematical Girls - Fermat's Last Theorem


Alt Names: alt Suugaku Girl - Fermat no Saishuu Teirialt 数学ガール フェルマーの最終定理
Author: Yuuki Hiroshi
Artist: Kasuga Shun
Genres: Harem HaremSchool Life School LifeSeinen Seinen
Type: Manga (Japanese)
Status: Ongoing
Description: "I" (Boku) love math. Just after the high school entrance ceremony, "I" meet a beautiful girl: Milka. Milka is a mathematical genius. She gives me many maths problems, she shows me many elegant solutions. Milka and I spend a long time by discussing maths in the school library.

One year later, I meet another mathematical girl: Tetra. Tetra is one year younger than me, and asks me to teach her mathematics. While I teach her, she begins to understand mathematics and gradually to love its elegance.

In this second volume (series), we talk about Pythagoras' Theorem, Elementary Number Theory, Group, Ring, Field, and Fermat's Last Theorem.
Go to Mathematical Girls - Fermat's Last Theorem Forums! | Scroll Down to Comments


Latest Forum Posts

Topic Started By Stats Last Post Info
No topics has been found for this comic.

x

Register now for full access! You'll be able to follow (bookmark) your favorites, get updates on new releases, and more! It's completely free and only takes a minute.



44 Comments

Yes, but can you prove that assertion (successfully)?

Well, if looking at the dailogue in the manga proves anything, then yes. I'd say that 80% of the dialogue so far has been math centered
Because of math, I got a harem(?) Didn't read it yet... I can't wait to read this one!

Only three fields for the groups, so I can only give the other two groups a mention here in the comments, they are Forgotten Scans and MangaIchi Scanlation Division.

2edgy4me.
QED.


I would say that your comment is far more "2edgy4me" than his which, frankly, wasn't at all. :P

Yes, but can you prove that assertion (successfully)?

2edgy4me.
QED.

I'm... I'm too stupid for this manga :(

Nope, you will be stupid only if you don't try to understand it.

 Miruka-san is best waifu. 

*looks at manga* *looks at comments* *looks back manga* We've been successfully invaded by mathematicians.

Yes, but can you prove that assertion (successfully)?

Yo, what is the answer on chapter 1 page 15 ? was just wondering since he didn't reveal it


He reveal the answer on page 33 of the same chapter.

I find these kind of puzzles kind of pointless, since it's often possible to find reasons for more than one of the options to be an 'odd one out'.

After all, what exactly stops me from defining a set A to contain all but one of the options, and then declare the final option the 'odd one out'?

Or I could take the polynomial y = (x-239)(x-251)(x-257)(x-263)(x-283), and declare 271 the 'odd one out' as the only one which is not a zero of my polynomial.

 

But I digress. I took a look at these numbers, and determined (what I think is) the most promising solution is 257 is the odd one out, as it is the only one not of the form 4n+3, where n is an integer. Still, this is slightly unsatisfying as it does not make mention of the fact that all these integers are primes.

 

On the other hand, 283 is the only one not of the form 3n + 200.  Ambiguity again!

 

But that's ok; you're not really supposed to find "the" right answer to these.  Coming up with a bunch of unique properties for each number in the list is a more productive thought exercise anyway.

Yo, what is the answer on chapter 1 page 15 ? was just wondering since he didn't reveal it

 

I find these kind of puzzles kind of pointless, since it's often possible to find reasons for more than one of the options to be an 'odd one out'.

After all, what exactly stops me from defining a set A to contain all but one of the options, and then declare the final option the 'odd one out'?

Or I could take the polynomial y = (x-239)(x-251)(x-257)(x-263)(x-283), and declare 271 the 'odd one out' as the only one which is not a zero of my polynomial.

 

But I digress. I took a look at these numbers, and determined (what I think is) the most promising solution is 257 is the odd one out, as it is the only one not of the form 4n+3, where n is an integer. Still, this is slightly unsatisfying as it does not make mention of the fact that all these integers are primes.

Yo, what is the answer on chapter 1 page 15 ? was just wondering since he didn't reveal it

BTW, can one of you mathematicians tell me in a concise and laypeople kinda way the story of the autodidactic German (?) guy who proved Fermat's Last Theorem decades before the formal proof was resolved by real mathematicians? The one who they only found out his proof worked years later after one of the people who discovered the formal proof looked back and reevaluated his work and realized he'd made only a few mistakes but his proof was actually legit? I keep hearing mathematicians talk about this guy in a sort of trivial but admiring way, but I can't find his real story (or name) anywhere. Please help. Also, what does his proof have to do with Ramanujan? I also often hear Ramanujan mentioned when stories about this guy are told, but where's the connection? Ramanujan would have died before the German guy was born, right?
In another site using the Japanese title for the manga. Clicks on manga, reads tags. Starts reading the first chapter, realize it's about math. Parfs.

I cannot say that i like Tetra's new character design...
Also aren't basic things like GCD (greatest common divisor) and LCM (least common multiple) tought in elementary school or something? I mean, they appear naturally when you add fractions...
That sneaky teacher...

Spoiler

Spoiler

I'm... I'm too stupid for this manga :(

I feel stupid.
*looks at manga* *looks at comments* *looks back manga* We've been successfully invaded by mathematicians.
Spoiler

 

Nah, you've got the right idea, just reworded in a different way. Considering two of the values a,b,c are consecutive, they will be coprime for sure. And from there, it's not a far leap to show that the difference will be coprime too.

Spoiler

I'm thinking of the difference between two adjacent square number (I don't know if that's a correct term). 

Spoiler

Since the difference contains every odd number, except for 1, there should be an infinite pythagorean triples as there are infinite odd square number. Of course that doesn't include all pythagorean triples such as 8,15,17.

I'm not a math major so excuse me for my confusing explanation.

I can't wait until we get to abstract algebra

 

tbh im not sure how he didnt immediately figure out the answer to the unit circle problem despite JUST DISCUSSING primitive Pythagorean triples

It's weird being a math major and reading this. 

 

Any way, for the first question for this chapter, there are infinite primitive pythagorean triples. Think about it this way:

 

1 = 1^2

1 + 3 = 2^2

1 + 3 + 5 = 3^2

1 + 3 + 5 + 7 = 4^2

1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + 9 = 5^2

 

And so on and so forth (which can be proved via induction). Therefore, if the last term in the sum is a perfect square, we can write our sum now as 

 

(1 + 3 + 5 + 7) + 9 = 4^2 + 3^2 = 5^2, and we have our first primitive pythagorean triple. Since this pattern is infinite, as there are infinitely many odd perfect squares, there will always be infinite primitive triples as well. There are more primitive triples that can be found without using this method, but this is a surefire method.

 

The second problem of the chapter ties into this problem. We can divide the Pythagorean equation a^2 + b^2 = c^2 by c^2 to get (a/c)^2 + (b/c)^2 = 1, where (a/c, b/c) is a rational point on the unit circle. Aaaaand since we just showed that there are infinite primitive triples, there will be infinite rational points as well using this method.

 

I understand that this isn't a true "valid" proof, as we haven't explicitly shown that the sum of odd numbers method gives us coprime values every time, but this is a website where we have people legitimately following Black Clover and reading To Love Ru Darkness. I don't think we have to explain further.

 

Anyway, apologies in advance if chapter 3 focuses on the answers for these and I spoiled you all.

Not surprised it's only three volumes. Forget most kids not liking to use their brains, even most adults would find no interest in this. This is an amazingly small niche work.

they're just trying to teach me math. there's no story here.

I wonder what did you expect from a manga with this title.

Milka, huh? I bet she’s ... sweet.

 

 

*badum tish*

 

xD

 

 

 

 

 

Alright, I’ll leave now.


Search Comics