Jump to content

Primary: Sky Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Secondary: Sky Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Pattern: Blank Waves Squares Notes Sharp Wood Rockface Leather Honey Vertical Triangles
* * * * * (4.6 - 292votes)

Otoyomegatari


Alt Names: alt Arojen Morsiametalt 乙嫁語りalt The Bride's Stories
Author: Mori Kaoru
Artist: Mori Kaoru
Genres: Award Winning Award WinningDrama DramaHistorical HistoricalRomance RomanceSeinen SeinenSlice of Life Slice of Life
Type: Manga (Japanese)
Status: Ongoing
Description: Set in Central Asia in a rural town near the Caspian Sea during the early 19th century, the story revolves around a young woman, Amir, who arrives from a distant village across the mountains to marry Karluk, a boy eight years her junior. The story unfolds among details of everyday family and community life. However, the peaceful atmosphere is disturbed when Amir's family demands to take her back to their village.
Go to Otoyomegatari Forums! | Scroll Down to Comments
The following content is intended for mature audiences and may contain sexual themes, gore, violence and/or strong language. Discretion is advised.


Latest Forum Posts

Topic Started By Stats Last Post Info
Topic Kaoru Mori Illustrating Amir. New Window JTai
  • 5 Replies
  • 2491 Views
Topic Mr Smith wimps out. New Window truepurple
  • 73 Replies
  • 5119 Views
Topic Otoyomegatari Chapters New Window Pold10
  • 43 Replies
  • 6112 Views
Topic Cultural accuracy New Window Tadao
  • 4 Replies
  • 872 Views

  • You must login to add chapters.

Chapters

Title Group Contributor Date
Vol.7 Ch.41: The Ceremony
Duralumin Duralumin 2 weeks ago
Vol.4 Ch.20 Read Online
Kotonaru IMC 11 May 2013 - 09:23 AM
Vol.4 Ch.19 Read Online
Kotonaru IMC 10 April 2013 - 07:10 AM
Ch.11 Read Online
Otomeganofansub davibleachero 16 January 2012 - 04:28 PM [A]
Vol.2 Ch.11 Read Online
Kotonaru IMC 05 March 2013 - 08:52 PM [A]
Ch.6 Read Online
Otomeganofansub davibleachero 16 January 2012 - 02:23 AM [A]
Ch.3 Read Online
Otomeganofansub davibleachero 16 January 2012 - 01:56 AM


539 Comments

They're not double twins. The girls are twins, but the boys are normal brothers. Also, in Arab societies double-sibling marriages are forbidden, but in the Turkoman style of Islam and especially in the version practiced by nomads, sibling-pairs are not only common but encouraged. 

Now that I think about it, there's nothing in mainstream Sunni law that actually forbids double-sibling marriages, so I'm not sure about it being forbidden in Arab societies?... Might be a cultural thing for them, though. It's not very common, certainly. Thanks for the info!

I'm sure they will become what we think of as sister wives now and her friend will become her husband's second wife.   It's quite a shame since he really loves her. 

sorry to see this lose those chapters...such a great manga....I would also suggest this one

http://bato.to/comic/_/comics/ja-ja-uma-grooming%E2%98%85up-r6632

They're not double twins. The girls are twins, but the boys are normal brothers. Also, in Arab societies double-sibling marriages are forbidden, but in the Turkoman style of Islam and especially in the version practiced by nomads, sibling-pairs are not only common but encouraged. This is largely due to the influence of Timurid Islam, because Timurid rulers (descendants of Tamerlane) practiced this a lot to cement dynastic loyalties. However, this is usually strictly an elder brother marrying the elder sister followed by the younger brother marrying the younger sister. The Timurids probably learned this practice from the Mongols (Timur himself was Turkoman despite claiming the Mongol Imperial throne in his later years) as it was common practice with the Mongols' imperial Borjigin clan from the time of Genghis Khan. Jagatai's own daughters were married off in sibling pairs, and Timur started his career in the Jagataid court. 

 

The situation with the twins is ambiguous since it doesn't seem they (or anyone) really know who is the elder sister. This was common in an era before births are timed in hospital records.

 

The original setting of Otoyomegatari was northeast of the Caspian Sea in what is now Kazakhstan. This is where Karluk and Amir live, probably a bit to the west of the Aral Sea. Amir in particular seems to be Kazakh from the way her family lives (although her regular clothes are wrong for a Kazakh woman and are closer to those of a Turkoman - thank Mori for this as the Kazakh female costume of this era looks dumb) and their deep knowledge of falconry. Karluk from his clothing and the sedentary lifestyle of his people seems to be an Eastern Turkoman possibly related to the Salar people in China or the much larger Uyghurs.

 

When Smith and Ali left Karluk's village, they traveled southeast towards the Aral Sea. In chapter 19 the Aral Sea was in front of Smith, and he was sitting on the camel facing left (he also fell into the water to the left of his camel). Since we know they were traveling south towards India, that would put them west of the Aral Sea. So the twins are Aral sea inhabitants in the general area of modern Kazakhstan.

 

All of a sudden they're now much further south and seem to be approaching India from the Baluchistan region. However, they're not quite there yet. Where are they then? The palatial residence of their host, his wife's Indian-inspired clothing, and strangely the presence of what is clearly a Turkish hammam (bathhouse) indicate that they must be in a large southern city of some sort, and not in the general area of either Afghanistan or Turkmenistan (where someone as thin as Anis would be having health problems wearing clothes that skimpy). That would put them somewhere in Persia (Iran in the present day) or already in northwest British India (now Pakistan). Well, bathhouses were also common in India and Persia, so they could be in either place (Mori was probably inspired by the hammam because it's the most common type of Muslim bathhouse today). However, the mention of asking for the Prophet's blessing (heretical in most Sunni teachings - you ask for ALLAH's blessing, not Muhammad's) and of course of Ali as the First Imam - not to mention allowing women to be officiator in a formal ceremony - mark them as clearly Shia. Since the Pakistani (Pashtuns, Punjabis, Afghanis, Baluchs, etc) peoples are mostly Sunni, that would put Smith and Ali still in Shia-dominated Persia.

 

For those who don't get the sisterhood ceremony, this is basically the female version of the Oath of the Peach Garden. Just like how men in martial societies swore oaths of brotherhood to each other in formal ceremonies with religious overtones, women also did in some societies. To some extent the women's oath has more significance than the men's ('coz to be fair men broke their oaths with distressing regularity - just ask the andas Temujin and Jamuka), because sisters in Muslim societies were expected to assist each other socially and economically at all times. In Persia (Iran) of the 19th century this led to the formation of an underground financing network where widows or divorced women ran businesses by collecting money from their sisters and friends and pool them into vast investment funds, with profits shared between members of the sisterhood or circle of friends. The businesses themselves were of course run by men, but the women held the reins. When one or more members of the network fell into hard times, the rest of the members would offer parts or all of their profit to help her. We're probably going to see this at play now that Shirin's husband is in trouble and Shirin's livelihood is in danger. Anis is significantly (like, maybe even hundreds of times) wealthier, so in these circumstances she's expected to start showering Shirin's family with cashola to support them. 

Wow, thanks for all this info. Let me ask you this: 

 

In the story Anis seems to have deep feelings about Shirin. Even it's funny that she seemed to not be aware about it, since when Shirin asked her why she married her, she didn't know why, which is a strong suggestion, to my western eyes, that Anis has some kind of attraction to Shirin, like a crush or something. Of course I could be wrong on that interpretation. Anyway, my question is, you describe the sisterhood bond as some kind of economical nexus very useful to get some help in Persia in the XIX century. What about the feelings between the women of that times who got that bond? There were feelings of friendship or some other kind of affection between them? There was another motivation beyond the economical benefit?

 

Thanks again!

Please take it with a grain of salt, as on previous chapters the scenario of the double twins marriage would not happens in muslim society and law

 

They're not double twins. The girls are twins, but the boys are normal brothers. Also, in Arab societies double-sibling marriages are forbidden, but in the Turkoman style of Islam and especially in the version practiced by nomads, sibling-pairs are not only common but encouraged. This is largely due to the influence of Timurid Islam, because Timurid rulers (descendants of Tamerlane) practiced this a lot to cement dynastic loyalties. However, this is usually strictly an elder brother marrying the elder sister followed by the younger brother marrying the younger sister. The Timurids probably learned this practice from the Mongols (Timur himself was Turkoman despite claiming the Mongol Imperial throne in his later years) as it was common practice with the Mongols' imperial Borjigin clan from the time of Genghis Khan. Jagatai's own daughters were married off in sibling pairs, and Timur started his career in the Jagataid court. 

 

The situation with the twins is ambiguous since it doesn't seem they (or anyone) really know who is the elder sister. This was common in an era before births are timed in hospital records.

 

The original setting of Otoyomegatari was northeast of the Caspian Sea in what is now Kazakhstan. This is where Karluk and Amir live, probably a bit to the west of the Aral Sea. Amir in particular seems to be Kazakh from the way her family lives (although her regular clothes are wrong for a Kazakh woman and are closer to those of a Turkoman - thank Mori for this as the Kazakh female costume of this era looks dumb) and their deep knowledge of falconry. Karluk from his clothing and the sedentary lifestyle of his people seems to be an Eastern Turkoman possibly related to the Salar people in China or the much larger Uyghurs.

 

When Smith and Ali left Karluk's village, they traveled southeast towards the Aral Sea. In chapter 19 the Aral Sea was in front of Smith, and he was sitting on the camel facing left (he also fell into the water to the left of his camel). Since we know they were traveling south towards India, that would put them west of the Aral Sea. So the twins are Aral sea inhabitants in the general area of modern Kazakhstan.

 

All of a sudden they're now much further south and seem to be approaching India from the Baluchistan region. However, they're not quite there yet. Where are they then? The palatial residence of their host, his wife's Indian-inspired clothing, and strangely the presence of what is clearly a Turkish hammam (bathhouse) indicate that they must be in a large southern city of some sort, and not in the general area of either Afghanistan or Turkmenistan (where someone as thin as Anis would be having health problems wearing clothes that skimpy). That would put them somewhere in Persia (Iran in the present day) or already in northwest British India (now Pakistan). Well, bathhouses were also common in India and Persia, so they could be in either place (Mori was probably inspired by the hammam because it's the most common type of Muslim bathhouse today). However, the mention of asking for the Prophet's blessing (heretical in most Sunni teachings - you ask for ALLAH's blessing, not Muhammad's) and of course of Ali as the First Imam - not to mention allowing women to be officiator in a formal ceremony - mark them as clearly Shia. Since the Pakistani (Pashtuns, Punjabis, Afghanis, Baluchs, etc) peoples are mostly Sunni, that would put Smith and Ali still in Shia-dominated Persia.

 

For those who don't get the sisterhood ceremony, this is basically the female version of the Oath of the Peach Garden. Just like how men in martial societies swore oaths of brotherhood to each other in formal ceremonies with religious overtones, women also did in some societies. To some extent the women's oath has more significance than the men's ('coz to be fair men broke their oaths with distressing regularity - just ask the andas Temujin and Jamuka), because sisters in Muslim societies were expected to assist each other socially and economically at all times. In Persia (Iran) of the 19th century this led to the formation of an underground financing network where widows or divorced women ran businesses by collecting money from their sisters and friends and pool them into vast investment funds, with profits shared between members of the sisterhood or circle of friends. The businesses themselves were of course run by men, but the women held the reins. When one or more members of the network fell into hard times, the rest of the members would offer parts or all of their profit to help her. We're probably going to see this at play now that Shirin's husband is in trouble and Shirin's livelihood is in danger. Anis is significantly (like, maybe even hundreds of times) wealthier, so in these circumstances she's expected to start showering Shirin's family with cashola to support them. 

I remember hearing that the costumes imply they're in or around the Persian gulf. 

This would make sense, since Shia is in the minority throughout most of the Islamic world, except for Iran/Iraq, both of which are located in the Persian Gulf area.

I really would like to know more about the sisterhood bond. Since it's historical manga, I guess there should be some similar real related tradition back in the XIX century and in that culture. Does anybody knows something about it or can post a link to some reliable source of information? Thanks in advance!

Please take it with a grain of salt, as on previous chapters the scenario of the double twins marriage would not happens in muslim society and law

I think he was silent out of love for her, more than anything else.  I found it heartwarming in one sense, since it shows how much he cares about her (he was genuinely willing to put that aside for now because he was glad to see her so happy -- I think he didn't want to make her worry or risk ruining this for her, since he's been concerned that she was so introverted before).  And I think intellectually he likely realized that she was just weighing them by totally different standards and not actually saying her new friend was more important than him.

 

I mean, obviously a marriage is give-and-take and he can't just ignore his feelings all the time, but this was clearly something very important to her, and I thought his reaction was based on that.

That works, too. But then, that's why communication is so important, right? Silence can be interpreted in almost any way you please.

Is there any mention of the place they are in right now?

Didn't know they are shia, I assumed they were sunni.

 

I remember hearing that the costumes imply they're in or around the Persian gulf. 

geez i'm glad i don't have to go through ceremonies to make friends

I think he was silent out of love for her, more than anything else.  I found it heartwarming in one sense, since it shows how much he cares about her (he was genuinely willing to put that aside for now because he was glad to see her so happy -- I think he didn't want to make her worry or risk ruining this for her, since he's been concerned that she was so introverted before).  And I think intellectually he likely realized that she was just weighing them by totally different standards and not actually saying her new friend was more important than him.

 

I mean, obviously a marriage is give-and-take and he can't just ignore his feelings all the time, but this was clearly something very important to her, and I thought his reaction was based on that.

Or he was secretly plotting the other woman's husband's death. >:C

This story is so lighthearted, though, that I very much doubt it.

In manga "..." almost always means there's something they want to say but aren't, or something is making them uncomfortable. My interpretation was that it made him a little uncomfortable, but he didn't want to say anything, probably for fear of seeming petty or insecure.

I think he was silent out of love for her, more than anything else.  I found it heartwarming in one sense, since it shows how much he cares about her (he was genuinely willing to put that aside for now because he was glad to see her so happy -- I think he didn't want to make her worry or risk ruining this for her, since he's been concerned that she was so introverted before).  And I think intellectually he likely realized that she was just weighing them by totally different standards and not actually saying her new friend was more important than him.

 

I mean, obviously a marriage is give-and-take and he can't just ignore his feelings all the time, but this was clearly something very important to her, and I thought his reaction was based on that.

I was expecting he to ask her: "Even more important than me?". But he didn't ask, so I guess for them it's clear the husband comes first and the sister after. 

In manga "..." almost always means there's something they want to say but aren't, or something is making them uncomfortable. My interpretation was that it made him a little uncomfortable, but he didn't want to say anything, probably for fear of seeming petty or insecure.

*shrugs* Slu- I mean, kids.

 6a00d83452b0d869e20147e086ba6f970b-200pi

I'm embarrassed to belong to the same gender as you. Please, whenever you're ready, pull your head out of your codpiece and join the rest of us in the 21st century.

Is there any mention of the place they are in right now?

Didn't know they are shia, I assumed they were sunni.

Bad news everyone! From the Duralumin blog the chapters were apparently taken down by a DMCA notice.

blog here:http://robofaget.tumblr.com/

As much as I like how the series try to give a view of different people, after awhile, all I want to really see is Amir and Karluk. Between the length between releases and switching between people, it felt like forever since the last time we've seen those two. Still dying to know the consequences of the events that happened, and how their relationship develops further.

 

I'm super hoping for a time skip, because him being so young and stinting their relationship is difficult to read.

As much as I like how the series try to give a view of different people, after awhile, all I want to really see is Amir and Karluk. Between the length between releases and switching between people, it felt like forever since the last time we've seen those two. Still dying to know the consequences of the events that happened, and how their relationship develops further.

i come back here after a several month hiatus of not reading much manga...and...it's all gone... Q_Q

where the fuck are all the chapters?

As a girl, I'd marry my friend just for an excuse to party! All I'm hearing is "yuri, yuri" but women's relationships evolved differently in highly patriarchal societies.  

Within those very same societies, if you're both female, you'd probably be either killed or shunned. In a society dependent on human interaction to attain things such as food and shelter, unless you're already a skilled hunter with your own tent pack, being shunned can kill you. At the very least, as females, the moment you're shunned you become targets for rape and/or enslavement.

What a lot of people fail to realize about these patriarchal societies is that they're very protective of their women and children. Without that protection, you're far more vulnerable than you can even imagine.

If, as a woman, you cannot defend yourself from quite literally everything (from other nefarious humans to wild beasts and even natural deaths such as hypothermia and starvation) at all times then you are dependent on society to keep you alive. So, you would likely think twice before opposing the traditions of your society. Regardless of however barbaric those traditions may seem to you, the alternative is often worse.

Interestingly, this is the first time we see actual depiction of Islam in the series, and apparently they're Shia? So, Smith must be somewhere in Iran now, avoiding Afghanistan and heading into British India via Baluchistan.

Uh, this seems as important as a marriage. I don't foresee anything good happening to her husband..

I was expecting he to ask her: "Even more important than me?". But he didn't ask, so I guess for them it's clear the husband comes first and the sister after. 

Uh, this seems as important as a marriage. I don't foresee anything good happening to her husband..


Search Comics

Highest Rated Comics


Recently Added Comics